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Below are the 5 most recent journal entries recorded in Science Fiction & Fantasy Literature for Pre-Adult's LiveJournal:

Thursday, January 22nd, 2009
2:48 pm
[bobquasit]
Cross-post
Here's a link to a post over on the Arisia community listing many more genre books and authors for children, teens, and young adults. These were all suggested by panelists and audience members for the "Beyond Hogwarts" and "YA SciFi & Fantasy" panels at Arisia 2009.
Wednesday, January 23rd, 2008
3:39 pm
[bobquasit]
2008 Arisia Handout
Here's the handout that I worked up this year. It's based on the previous one, but has been considerably expanded.

Here’s a list of older science fiction and fantasy books for children; they tend to be better-written, use a wider vocabulary, and are just more fun.

In defining “genre” for this list I have deliberately cast a wide net. The majority of children’s literature incorporates fantastic elements, because unlike adults, children will not sit still through a boring book. Talking animals, trolls, fairies, dinosaurs, and robots abound!

The ages listed are merely my own best guesses; your mileage may vary.

Author Title Notes
Alexander,
Lloyd
The
Chronicles of Prydain
The
classic five-volume fantasy and coming-of-age series,
beginning with The Book of Three. Ages 9+
Allum,
Tom
Boy
Beyond the Moon
Alternate
title Emperor of Space. From Great Britain. A
very well done science fiction novel suitable for boys
age seven and older, at a guess. A modern-day English boy
named Guy befriends a famous, reclusive scientist who has
moved in across the moors. In time, he discovers that the
scientist has built a working space ship. It isn't long
before Guy finds himself trapped on that spaceship along
with a gang of escaped prisoners and the now-insane
professor, on a trip to the tenth planet of the solar
system: Imperator. Adventure and excitement in abundance.
Unfortunately, this book is also incredibly rare, at
least in the USA.
Arthur,
Robert
Ghosts
and More Ghosts
Also Mystery
and More Mystery
. Arthur was also the author of the
original Three Investigators books, which
although not strictly genre - they were mysteries - are
also very good indeed. Be careful with later editions; in
some of them, the character of Alfred Hitchcock was
replaced by "Hector Sebastian" and other
fictional persons.
Banks, Lynne Reid The
Indian in the Cupboard
And the
sequel.
Brock,
Betty
No
Flying in the House
A little
girl discovers that she's descended from fairies. How
does she know? Because she can kiss her elbow. For some
reason many people remember the plot, but forget the
title and author. Ages 8+
Cameron, Eleanor The
Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet
Also the
sequels. Ages 6+
Dahl, Roald Charlie
and the Chocolate Factory
Also the
sequel, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, in
which the Buckets and Mr. Wonka travel into space!
Del Ray, Lester The
Runaway Robot
Simplistic
but touching story of an unusual robot and his struggle
to keep from being separated from his boy. Ages 7+
Del
Ray, Lester
Tunnel
Through Time
Time
travel and dinosaurs. What's not to love? Ages 8+
Grahame, Kenneth The
Wind In The Willows
Classic
English novel of talking animals. Warning, some modern
editions are badly cut.
Heinlein, Robert A. All the
juveniles
Heinlein
wrote too many classic young-adult coming-of-age genre
books to list here; he practically revived the modern
form of the genre single-handedly. He also wrote adult
novels, of course, so make sure not to confuse those with
the juveniles.
Henderson, Zenna The People
books
A little
of Zenna goes a long way; after a while many of her
stories start to seem similar, and are painfully
saccharine. But I enjoyed them as a child. Ages 9+
Hitchcock, Alfred (ed) Alfred Hitchcock's
Monster Museum
There were a number
of excellent genre books (primarily horror, mystery, and
fantasy) for older children published under Hitchcock's
name (my understanding is that he wasn't actually
involved in producing any of them). Some of them were
anthologies of classic older stories, but some were
collections of stories by Robert Arthur, who did the
actual editing on all of them. They were generally
excellent. They include (Alfred Hitchcock's) Solve-Them-Yourself
Mysteries
, Spellbinders in Suspense, Haunted
Houseful
, Ghostly Gallery, etc.
Hughes,
Ted
The
Iron Man
Quite
different from The Iron Giant movie, according
to what I've heard; I haven't read it myself, yet. A
recent edition was retitled The Iron Giant.
Keith, Donald The
Time Machine To The Rescue
Also Mutiny
in the Time Machine
. Originally published in Boy's
Life magazine. Well-written time travel, rather
reminiscent of Heinlein (who also published fiction in
Boy’s Life).
Key, Alexander The
Forgotten Door
A boy
with strange powers and amnesia befriends a family, and
must find his way home. By the author of Escape to Witch
Mountain (which is also well worth reading). Well done.
Ages 10+
Kipling, Rudyard The
Jungle Book
Classic,
early fantasy from one of England's greatest writers.
Also The Second Jungle Book
Kipling, Rudyard Kim For
older children; although not strictly genre this coming-of-age
novel set in the colonial India of Kipling's youth is at
least partly the inspiration for some of Heinlein's
juveniles. An absolutely wonderful book.
L'Engle,
Madeleine
A
Wrinkle in Time
The
sequels were perhaps not as good, but are worth exploring.
Ages 10+
Lewis, C.S. The
Chronicles of Narnia
Undisputed
classics of children's fantasy. Some parents may be
concerned by the Christian aspect of the story, which
only becomes overt (though not offensively so) in the
final book.
Lofting, Hugh The
Story of Doctor Dolittle
The
Doctor learns to speak to animals, and among his
adventures in the 19 sequels he even travels to the Moon!
The original books included some language about race
which jars modern publishers, so modern editions are
generally bowdlerized. The books are, I would argue, not
racist at all. Ages 6+
Pearl,
Jack
The Space
Eagle
books
SF. Operation
Star Voyage
and Operation Doomsday. A
millionaire playboy-inventor leads a secret life as a
space-travelling hero. Somewhat Bondian, in a non-sexual
sense. Ages 10+
Pene du Bois, William The
Twenty-One Balloons
A
classic fantasy-adventure set in the South Seas, with
many wild balloon-related inventions. Ages 8+
Pene du Bois, William The Otto
books
Several
books suitable for younger readers (and read-to's) about
Otto, the huge yellow dog who preceded Clifford the Big
Red Dog by quite a few years. Ages 2+
Rockwell, Thomas The
Portmanteau Book
A
riotous (and extremely funny) collection of all sorts of
stories, art, and oddities (including an invasion by
aliens that are enormous hands and make everyone go to
school) by the author of How to Eat Fried Worms.
Silverberg, Robert (ed) The
Science Fiction Hall of Fame, volume 1
The
definitive anthology of classic short science fiction
stories from the 1950s and earlier. Suitable for most
teens. Ages 13+
Snyder,
Zilpha Keatley
Black
and Blue Magic
A modern-day
boy gets a potion which, when rubbed into his shoulder
blades, allows him to sprout huge white wings - and fly.
Ages 9+. Memorable.
Tolkien,
J.R.R.
The
Hobbit
Needs no
introduction!
Tuesday, January 16th, 2007
1:05 pm
[bobquasit]
Another list

Here's a list of authors and books, some from my handout, others that I thought of during the panel. I'm sure there are many more that I'll remember as time goes by, so I plan to add to this - and, of course, I'll be crossposting this to the LiveJournal community for safekeeping.

As I mentioned at the panel, I prefer older books; they tend to be better written, with a deeper vocabulary - in other words, to be less insulting to the intelligence of the young fan.

As in the panel, I should mention the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen.



Grahame, Kenneth - The Wind In The Willows - Classic English novel of talking animals. Warning, some modern editions are badly cut. Ages 10+

Alexander, Lloyd - The Chronicles of Prydain - A five-volume fantasy series, beginning with The Book of Three. Classics. Ages 10+

Lewis, C.S. - The Chronicles of Narnia - Undisputed classics of children's fantasy. Some parents may be concerned by the Christian aspect of the story, which only becomes overt (though not offensively so) in the final book. Ages 8+

Tolkien, J.R.R. - The Hobbit - What more can be said? Ages 8+

Pearl, Jack - The Space Eagle books - SF. Operation Star Voyage and Operation Doomsday. Rare, out of print. Ages 10+

Kipling, Rudyard - The Jungle Book - Classic, early fantasy from one of England's greatest writers. Also The Second Jungle Book. Ages 10+

Kipling, Rudyard - Kim - For older children (10+), but a great read for adults too. Although not strictly genre, this classic coming-of-age novel set in the colonial India of Kipling's youth is at least partly the inspiration for some of Heinlein's juveniles (particularly Citizen of the Galaxy). Not to be missed. Ages 10+

Keith, Donald - The Time Machine To The Rescue - Also Mutiny in the Time Machine. Originally published in Boy's Life. Well-written time travel. Out of print but worth searching for. Ages 8+

Heinlein, Robert A. - All the juveniles - Heinlein wrote too many classic young-adult genre books to list here; he practically revived the modern form of the genre single-handedly. He also wrote some rather “adult” adult novels, so make sure not to confuse those with the juveniles. Ages: Varies, but mostly 10+

Dahl, Roald - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - Also the sequel, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator, in which the Buckets and Mr. Wonka travel into space! Ages 5+

L'Engle, Madeleine - A Wrinkle in Time - The sequels were perhaps not as good, but may be worth exploring. Ages 12+

Rockwell, Thomas - The Portmanteau Book - A riotous (and extremely funny) collection of all sorts of stories, art, and oddities (including an invasion by aliens that are enormous hands and make everyone go to school) by the author of How to Eat Fried Worms. Ages 7+

Silverberg, Robert (ed) - The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, volume 1 - The definitive anthology of classic short science fiction stories from the 1950s and earlier. Suitable for most teens. Ages 13+

Key, Alexander - The Forgotten Door - A boy with strange powers and amnesia befriends a family, and must find his way home. By the author of Escape to Witch Mountain (which is also well worth reading). Well done. Ages 10+

Cameron, Eleanor - The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet - Also the sequels. Ages 6+

Henderson, Zenna - The People books - A little of Zenna goes a long way; after a while her stories all run together, and are painfully saccharine. But I enjoyed them as a child. Ages 9+

Del Ray, Lester - The Runaway Robot - Simplistic but touching story of an unusual robot and his struggle to keep from being separated from his boy. Ages 7+

Del Ray, Lester - Tunnel Through Time - Time travel and dinosaurs. Ages 8+

Pene du Bois, William - The Twenty-One Balloons - A classic fantasy-adventure set in the South Seas. Ages 8+

Pene du Bois, William - The Otto books - Several books suitable for younger readers (and read-to's) about Otto, the huge yellow dog who preceded Clifford the Big Red Dog by quite a few years. Ages 2+

Hughes, Ted - The Iron Man - Quite different from The Iron Giant movie, according to what I've heard; I haven't read it myself, yet. A recent edition was retitled The Iron Giant.

Banks, Lynne Reid - The Indian in the Cupboard - And the sequel.

Hitchcock, Alfred (ed) - Alfred Hitchcock's Monster Museum - There were a number of excellent genre books (primarily horror, mystery, and fantasy) for older children published under Hitchcock's name (my understanding is that he wasn't actually involved in producing any of them). Some of them were anthologies of classic older stories, but some were collections of stories by Robert Arthur, who did the actual editing on all of them. They were generally excellent. They include (Alfred Hitchcock's) Solve-Them-Yourself Mysteries, Spellbinders in Suspense, Haunted Houseful, Ghostly Gallery, etc.

Arthur, Robert - Ghosts and More Ghosts - Also Mystery and More Mystery. Arthur was also the author of the original Three Investigators books, which although not strictly genre - they were mysteries - are also very good indeed. Be careful with later editions; in some of them, the character of Alfred Hitchcock was replaced by "Hector Sebastian" and other fictional persons.

Current Mood: accomplished

Monday, January 15th, 2007
1:32 pm
[bobquasit]
2007
Well, a year has passed and another Arisia panel on this topic has come and gone. Arisia has set up forums on their site for many of the panels, but since those forums will apparently be deleted eventually, I'm cross-posting everything between the two.

Beyond Hogwarts: A Young Fan's Reading List

Here's a link to the handout that I made up for the panel. I hope that Ed can get his handout up as well. For one thing, I need a copy. :D

Arisia 2007 Children's Literature Panel handout (pdf)

A number of other authors came to my mind during the panel; fortunately I noted them all down, and will post them here soon.

Sunday, January 15th, 2006
6:24 pm
[bobquasit]
First Post
I'd like to start by putting up a few of the better books that I wanted to recommend.

Black and Blue Magic by Zilpha Keatley Snyder. A modern-day boy gets a potion which, when rubbed into his shoulder blades, allows him to sprout huge white wings - and fly. Ages 9-12. Memorable.

No Flying in the House by Betty Brock. A little girl discovers that she's descended from fairies. How does she know? Because she can kiss her elbow.

Boy Beyond the Moon by Tom Allum. Alternate title "Emperor of Space". 1960? From Great Britain. A very well done science fiction novel suitable for boys age seven and older, at a guess. A modern-day English boy named Guy befriends a famous, reclusive scientist who has moved in across the moors. In time, he discovers that the scientist has built a working space ship. It isn't long before Guy finds himself trapped on that spaceship along with a gang of escaped prisoners and the now-insane professor, on a trip to the tenth planet of the solar system: Imperator. Adventure and excitement in abundance. Unfortunately, this book is also incredibly rare, at least in the USA.

I'd like to expand these entries, but we've just got back from the con and I'm dead tired. Please, anyone, feel free to add your own favorites!
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